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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport has been closed by fighting. and as that fighting intensifies much of syria's internet network has been cut. the government and opposition are blaming each other for the shutdown. whatever the truth, syria's regime is battling these men for its very survival. president assad's helicopters are being shot down. and even a mig jet was filmed tumbling from the sky. this rebel boasting that he's downed both a helicopter and a mig within 24 hours. these surface to air missiles have been looted from captured military bases. what do we first with it a voice can be heard asking. not everybody knows how this newfound firepower works. yet this islamist brigade near damascus now ha
, margaret warner examines what the latest clashes tell us about the strength of the assad regime and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern danceo contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour
if it should play a more direct role to overthrow the syrian president bashar al assad. right now the united states is just giving humanitarian aid to that country. in the meantime, rebel forces take their fight with the syrian army to the skies. they shot down a helicopter, supposedly, using a rocket. the video was then posted on youtube. [ shouting ] >> cnn cannot independently confirm this video is authentic, but you could hear the rebels are cheering after that rocket hit the helicopter. and as arwa damon found out, rebels say they shot down three fighter jets in the past days. >> reporter: children on the back of a tractor make off with a sizeable tangled lump of metal. what was all too often the cause of nightmares, now a trophy of war. proudly shown off. [ speaking in foreign language ] >> translator: we want to take these pieces to show them to the other villages, he says. let them see what happened to these planes. everyone we speak to here describes the fear they felt, any time they heard a jet overhead. for them, this is the greatest victory. one man who we spoke to said he was pi
concerned, harsh warnings came from the president himself. >> i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences, and you will be held accountable. >> reporter: a senior official tells abc news there are contingency plans for military action if the weapons became a threat. the syrian regime said it would not use chemical weapons under any circumstance, but president ass assad's father used them, and assad himself has been massacring his citizens for nearly two straight years. martha raddatz, abc news, washington. >> it's a little hard to believe since tens of thousands of folks have been killed already, use of chemical weapons would be off limits to the syrian regime right now. considering rebels have made advances that may be one of the most powerful weapons the government has in its arsenal right now. again, that's a red line according to the u.s. if chemicals are used, that could draw us into this
throughout the entire country. op sfwligs active i says saying this is a tactic that the assad regime has used in the past, although not as widespread as it seems to be in this case. we've been traveling quite extensively over the last two days, and what is quite striking is that areas, neighborhoods, cities that, one could not travel through, say, two months ago because they were under the control of the assad regime or because they were battle zones are now beginning to have signs of civilian life returning to them because they are firmly in control of the opposition. in fact, there are vast areas of territory in aleppo territory that the government no longer controls, except for sporadic cities that are predominantly shia but by and large in the parts of the aleppo, we've been able to travel significantly more east than what we've been able to based on two months ago. >> i understand that we are communicating via satellite. because of the cell phone service, it's down. who is responsible, first of all, for this blackout, this information blackout, this international blackout, and how i
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)